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Frequently Asked Questions - Advanced Practice Registered Nurse

APRN Application

What is the first step to obtaining an advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) license in Texas?

A nurse who wishes to be licensed to practice as an APRN in the state of Texas must be licensed as a Registered Nurse in Texas or have a current, valid RN license with multistate privilege...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Can I send my RN endorsement application and my APRN application in together?

Yes, however we will not grant any level of approval until you hold a current, valid RN license (temporary or full) or privilege to practice in the state of Texas.

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How can I obtain the APRN application?

If you wish to submit your application online, please click here. If you are not eligible to submit an application online or prefer not to use the online application, you may obtain a copy of...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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How long will it take you to approve my application?

We make every attempt to review and respond as quickly as possible, but the process may take up to 30 business days based on the volume of applications received at any given time. Applications and supporting documentation are processed in the order in which they are received.

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What can I do to speed up the approval process?

Review your application before you submit it; many times simple mistakes are made or questions are not answered and this may result in a delay in obtaining approval. In addition, please...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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What are the educational requirements for APRN licensure in Texas?

The educational requirements may be found in Board Rule 221.3. Although you may have been licensed/authorized as an APRN in another state, you must meet the educational requirements set by the Texas Board of Nursing in order to be licensed as an APRN in Texas. We recommend you review this rule very carefully before you submit your application.

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How will I know if you have everything you need to process the application?

Any requests for additional information will be written requests (e-mail if available) that will be mailed to your address of record. Due to the high volume of applications we receive, we generally will not call to alert you of mistakes or the need for new information.

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Can I call you to check on the status of my application?

Please understand that it generally takes us about 30 days to review and respond to new applications or new information that is sent to our office. If you call our office, we may not have had a chance to review your application. We make every attempt to review information as quickly as possible and to respond in writing (e-mail if available) with an approval or with a request for additional information.

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I sent in my transcript and/or national certification with my RN endorsement application. Do I need to send another one with my APRN application?

Yes. Each application to our office requires its own set of documentation.

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Can I send my APRN application and Prescriptive Authority application in together?

The application that is currently on the web site allows you to apply for both advanced practice licensure and prescriptive authority in a single application. Prescriptive authority is an optional authorization. If you are requesting only licensure as an advanced practice registered nurse, a $100 processing fee is required. If you are requesting both licensure and prescriptive authority, a $150 processing fee is required.

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What is interim approval?

Interim approval allows an applicant to begin working as an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse during a period of time when the board is waiting for additional information. The APRN office...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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I just graduated from my APRN program. Can I work before I take the certification exam?

The Texas Board of Nursing no longer issues interim approval to new graduates who have not yet taken and passed their national certification examinations. You must submit evidence of current national certification (must show expiration date) before you will be eligible for interim approval or full advanced practice licensure.

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I'm nationally certified as an APRN. Do I still need to apply for licensure?

Yes. National certification is one of the requirements for licensure as an APRN in Texas. However, you must meet all of the requirements that are outlined in Rules 221.3 and 221.4 in order to be licensed, practice, or hold yourself out as an APRN in Texas.

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Can I call myself an APRN and/or use my advanced practice title if I have completed an APRN program and/or if I'm nationally certified?

All advanced practice registered nurse titles are protected and may only be used by those nurses who meet the requirements for licensure as an APRN. You must apply for and receive an APRN...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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I'm licensed as an APRN in another state. Can I endorse into Texas as an APRN?

No, endorsement is not available for those who desire to be licensed as an APRN in Texas. Any person wishing to be licensed as an APRN in Texas must meet the requirements that are outlined in Rule 221, regardless of licensure in another state or prior work experience. APRN requirements vary from state to state. Therefore, please read Rule 221 carefully to determine that you are eligible for APRN licensure in Texas.

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What is the Nurse Licensure Compact?

The Nurse Licensure Compact is an agreement between states that allows a nurse to obtain an RN license in the nurse's primary state of residence and allows the nurse to practice as an RN in any other Compact state without obtaining an RN license in that state....Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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How does the Nurse Licensure Compact affect my ability to work as an APRN in Texas?

If you have a current, valid Compact RN license, you are not required to obtain a Texas RN license before applying for APRN licensure in Texas.

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What if I have eligibility issues (such as criminal history or disciplinary action in another state or on a different type of professional license)?

You are required to declare certain information as described in the questions on the application and provide a written explanation of the incident(s) you are declaring. Once all necessary documentation is received, we will forward this information to our enforcement department for review....Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Once I am approved as an APRN, do I need to submit a new application to expand into a different role or population focus area of practice? Isn’t an APRN license good for practice in any area?

In answer to your second question, no. APRN licensure is granted for the purpose of authorizing a nurse to practice in a particular role and population focus area (such as family nurse practitioner or nurse-midwife). The license is based on your formal education in a specific advanced practice...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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APRN Certification

Acute Care Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Examination

Please be advised that the Texas Board of Nursing now recognizes the Pediatric Nursing Certification Board’s (PNCB’s) acute care pediatric nurse practitioner examination. This examination will meet the certification requirement for advanced practice registered nurses who were educated...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Policy Regarding the Acceptance of APRN National Certification Examination Reviews Performed by NCSBN

Rule 221.4(b) requires that applicants for authorization to practice as an advanced practice registered nurse obtain national certification in their advanced role and specialty if they completed their advanced educational program on or after January 1, 1996. The Texas Board of Nursing (Board)...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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APRN Credentials

I am a nurse in Texas and recently graduated with a Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP). Can I use the title "Dr" when I work with patients and other healthcare providers?

One of the hallmarks of nursing is the approach to lifelong learning. As nurses earn advanced degrees, the number of nurses earning doctoral degrees is increasing. The longstanding tradition...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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APRN Education

Doctor of Nursing Practice Degree

Within the last year, there has been a great deal of discussion at the national level about the doctor of nursing practice degree. This degree is promoted by professional organizations such as the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN)....Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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I am an APRN. Can I just complete the APRN refresher course in lieu of completing the RN refresher course?

No. You must complete the RN refresher course in its entirety before your RN license may be reinstated. You must have a current RN license in order to complete an APRN refresher course/extensive orientation.

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APRN Scope of Practice

The physician I work with wants me to perform a specific procedure as part of the services I provide in my practice setting. I did not learn how to do this procedure in my advanced practice program, but the physician is willing to teach me. Is it ok if the physician shows me how to perform the procedure?

The Standards of Nursing Practice in Rule 217.11 require nurses to accept only those assignments that take into consideration patient safety and that are commensurate with their own educational preparation, experience, knowledge, and physical and emotional ability [(1)(T)]....Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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I am licensed to practice in a particular population focus area. I want to expand my scope of practice to include a second population focus area. (Examples of this situation include but are not limited to: adult health expanding to include pediatrics, family practice expanding to include care of patients with complex psychiatric pathologies, and primary care expanding to include acute/critical care). Can I do this by completing continuing nursing education activities specific to the population focus and working with another advanced practice registered nurse licensed in that population focus or a physician?

There are finite limits to expanding one's scope of practice without completing additional formal education and obtaining the requisite licensure to practice in the additional role and/or...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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An advanced practice registered nurse has recently joined my practice. I have requested that this advanced practice registered nurse provide certain services that he/she says are not within his/her scope of practice. As a registered nurse, his/her scope of practice encompasses nursing care of patients across the lifespan in all settings—from critical care to home health and everything in between. Why isn't his/her advanced practice scope of practice the same? As a physician, I can see any patient.

The RN scope of practice is extremely broad without limitation as to setting or patient population because the education the nurse completed to prepare him/her to practice as an RN was broad. His/Her RN education provided him/her with didactic (classroom) and clinical learning...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Does the BON consider the scope of practice for a clinical nurse specialist equivalent to the nurse practitioner scope of practice?

The BON has been regulating advanced practice registered nurses since 1980. It has always viewed the clinical nurse specialist and nurse practitioner roles as separate and distinct roles. The Board acknowledges that there may be some overlap in the scopes of practice of these two categories of advanced practice registered nurses. The amount of overlap will vary based on the individual's advanced practice educational preparation.

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What requirements need to be met for advanced practice registered nurses who want to first assist and be reimbursed for their services?

HB 1718, passed in the 79th Regular Legislative Session (2005), amended the Nursing Practice Act to include Section 301.353. This section defines a nurse first assist as an individual who:...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Is it within the advanced practice registered nurse's scope of practice to provide services such as ordering home health services or performing FAA medical examinations for pilots?

Although many categories of advanced practice registered nurses may have been educated to provide these and many other patient care services, other laws and regulations [such as...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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My office practice employs two advanced practice registered nurses who are approved in different population foci. I understand that there is overlap in their scopes of practice. [An example of such a situation is an OB/GYN setting in which both a family nurse practitioner (FNP) and a women's health nurse practitioner (WHNP) practice]. Does this mean both advanced practice registered nurses have the same scope of practice in this setting?

BON Rule 221.12 defines the advanced practice registered nurse's scope of practice. It is important to understand that scope of practice for the advanced practice registered nurse is founded first and foremost upon his/her advanced educational preparation....Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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May an Advanced Practice Registered Nurse (APRN) delegate tasks to other nurses or unlicensed assistive personnel using the same rules a physician uses?

No. Advanced practice registered nurses are regulated solely by the Texas Board of Nursing. As RNs, advanced practice registered nurses may only delegate tasks to unlicensed staff or...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Duty to Initiate CPR and Pronouncement of Death

Is current CPR certification a licensure requirement for nurses?

No. The Texas Board of Nursing (Board or BON) does not require CPR for licensure renewal; however, employers may have specific requirements for maintaining current CPR status as a condition of employment. Nurses should use their professional judgment when deciding to maintain...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Do all nurses have an obligation to initiate CPR for a client? Does the Texas Board of Nursing have rules that establish a nurse's duty to initiate CPR?

Yes. All nurses have an obligation or duty to initiate CPR for clients who require resuscitative measures. The decision to initiate CPR can ";preserve life, restore health, relieve suffering, limit disability, and respect the individual's decisions, rights, and privacy." In all healthcare settings, nurses must initiate CPR immediately in the absence of a client’s do-not-resuscitate/out of hospital do-not-resuscitate order. A...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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What is the role of the licensed vocational nurse (LVN), registered nurse (RN), and advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) in initiating CPR in a witnessed arrest?

In the absence of a do-not-resuscitate/out of hospital do-not-resuscitate order from a physician, all nurses should initiate CPR immediately in a witnessed arrest, regardless of healthcare setting. CPR should continue and the physician should be notified of the client’s change in condition to include current life-saving interventions being provided to the client.

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Does the BON have a position statement that addresses the RN's role in the management of an unwitnessed cardiac or respiratory arrest in a long-term care facility?

Yes, Position Statement 15.20, Registered Nurses in the Management of an Unwitnessed Arrest in a Resident in a Long-Term Care Facility. The purpose of this position statement is to provide...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Are nurses expected to perform CPR on clients with obvious clinical signs of irreversible death?

Nurses should know and follow their facility, agency or employer’s policies in advance of establishing a nurse-patient relationship....Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Does the Texas Board of Nursing have purview over the pronouncement of death?

No. The Board of Nursing does not have purview over physician practice, employer policies, or the laws regulating the pronouncement of death in Texas. Additional information on Texas regulations regarding pronouncement of death may be found in the Texas Health and Safety Code Chapter 671 and Texas Administrative Code Chapter 193 (22 TAC, §193.9).

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Is there a difference between the decision to initiate CPR and the decision to pronounce death? Can an RN or an APRN pronounce death?

Yes. The decision to initiate CPR for all nurses should be a spontaneous clinical decision and nursing intervention for a client in cardiac or respiratory arrest. Delay in initiating CPR can be critical to the outcome of CPR. CPR should not be delayed to review the client’s medical record or chart to determine the client’s wishes or search physician orders for...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Can LVNs pronounce death or accept an order to pronounce death in Texas?

No. The Board of Nursing Position Statement 15.2 addresses the Role of The Licensed Vocational Nurse in the Pronouncement of Death. LVNs have a directed scope of practice under the supervision of RNs, APRNs, PAs, Physicians, Dentists, and Podiatrists....Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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What additional references are available should be considered when establishing policies and procedures for nursing staff in my facility?

In addition to the current American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care, the Board website (www.bon.texas.gov) may provide assistance and serve as a resource in developing policies and procedures to further support safe practice...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Duty to Report Confidential Health Information

Do nurses have a duty to report confidential health information to administrators, law enforcement of to a patient's family?

In January 2013, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services - Office for Civil Rights issued clarification regarding the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) titled, Message to Our Nation's Health Care Providers. The message can be found at http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/office/lettertonationhcp.pdf....Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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What needs to be provided on a prescription?

Rule 222.4(b): Minimum Standards for Signing Prescriptions.

See Rule 222.4(b)

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Rule 222.8: Authority to Order and Prescribe Controlled Substances

See Rule 222.8

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General Senate Bill 406 Questions:

Does the physician’s name need to be included on the prescription?

Yes, the physician’s name, address and telephone number are required to be included on the prescription drug order. If the prescription is for a controlled substance, the physician’s DEA number is also required to be included on the prescription. SB 406 did not change the requirements for what needs to be included on a prescription drug order.

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Is there still a ratio for the number of APRNs or PAs to whom a physician may delegate prescriptive authority?

The answer to the question depends on the practice setting. In facility-based hospital practices and in practices that serve medically underserved populations, there are no limitations. In all other practice settings, one physician may delegate to no more than seven full time equivalent APRNs and PAs (1:7 FTEs).

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Is there a waiver if a physician wants to delegate prescriptive authority to more than seven full time equivalent APRNs and PAs?

No, the waiver process no longer exists. A physician may only delegate prescriptive authority to more than seven full time equivalent APRNs and PAs in facility based hospital practices and in practices that serve medically underserved populations. In all other settings and practice scenarios, the 1:7 FTE ratios applies.

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How many delegating physicians may one APRN or PA have?

There is no limit to the number of physicians who may delegate prescriptive authority to an APRN or PA provided all requirements for such delegation are met.

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Do the requirements for types of practice sites still apply?

No. The old site-based prescriptive authority system is no longer in effect.

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What is a dangerous drug? Are these legend drugs?

Texas is one of just a few states that use the term “dangerous drugs.” The Dangerous Drug Act defines a dangerous drug as a device or drug that is unsafe for self-medication and that is not included in Schedules I through V or Penalty Groups 1 through 4 of Chapter 481, Health and Safety Code (Texas Controlled Substances Act). The term includes a device or drug that bears, or is required to bear, the legend: “Caution: federal law prohibits dispensing without prescription” or “Rx only” or another legend that complies with federal law. Many other states use the term “legend drugs.”

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Is prescriptive authority required to order durable medical equipment (DME)?

Yes. SB 406 clarified that it is necessary to have prescriptive authority to order these devices. In the past, it was not clear to DME suppliers that APRNs and PAs had this authority. The changes to the law as a result of the passage of SB 406 clearly indicate that APRNs and PAs may order or prescribe this equipment provided all requirements for delegation of prescriptive authority are met.

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Do I have to produce my prescriptive authority agreement or facility-based protocol if a licensing board asks to see it?

Yes. You are required to provide a copy of the prescriptive authority agreement to the board that requested it within three business days. Although SB 406 did not specifically note that...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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What is the difference between medication orders and prescriptions?

A medication order is an order for administration of a drug or device to a patient in a hospital for administration while the patient is in the hospital or for emergency use on the...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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How many miles from my delegating physician can my practice site be?

SB 406 eliminated site based prescriptive authority. The law is silent regarding the practice location of the physician and its proximity to the practice site of the APRN or PA. That said,...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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What are the Texas Medical Board’s requirements for a physician who delegates to an APRN or PA?

All prescriptive delegation requires adequate supervision under the Medical Practice Act. As such, a physician delegating to an APRN or PA must adequately supervise those individuals. An individual physician may serve in both the supervising and delegating role and does not need to be physically present at all times to be considered to have adequate supervision.

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Questions related to Prescriptive Authority Agreements:

Do I need to have a protocol in addition to a prescriptive authority agreement?

APRNs and PAs are required to have delegated authority to provide medical aspects of patient care. Historically, this delegation has occurred through a protocol or other written authorization. Rather than have two documents, this delegation can now be included in a prescriptive authority agreement if both parties agree to do so.

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Can more frequent meetings be required?

Yes as agreed to by the parties to the prescriptive authority agreement. The requirements for monthly and quarterly meetings are the minimum requirements specified in Texas law. You may...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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What constitutes a license that is in good standing for purposes of entering a prescriptive authority agreement?

An APRN or PA may enter into a prescriptive authority agreement unless his/her license is revoked, suspended, delinquent, inactive, has been voluntarily surrendered, or is subject to a...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Do I have to disclose information regarding investigations and discipline? If so, to whom must this information be disclosed?

Yes. Prior to signing a prescriptive authority agreement, you must disclose to the other party/parties to the prescriptive authority agreement if you have been disciplined in the past. This...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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What needs to be included in a prescriptive authority agreement?

Prescriptive authority agreements must include the following elements:...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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How many charts must be reviewed?

The law does not provide a specific number or percentage of charts that must be reviewed. Rather, the law provides that the number of charts to be reviewed is determined by the parties...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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How often are face to face meetings required?

The meetings must occur at least monthly until the third anniversary of the date the agreement is executed. However, if the APRN or PA was in a prescriptive authority agreement with...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Is credit given for time practiced in a supervised prescriptive authority arrangement prior to November 1, 2013?

The calculation under Chapter 157, Texas Occupations Code, of the amount of time an APRN or PA has practiced under the delegated prescriptive...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Can we skip doing face to face meetings if the physician and APRN or PA practices together at the same location?

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What if an alternate physician is involved in delegation of prescriptive authority on a temporary basis?

The prescriptive authority agreement designates who may serve as an alternate physician if alternate physician supervision will be utilized. If an alternate physician(s) will participate in the quality assurance and improvement meetings with the APRN or PA, this information must be included in the prescriptive authority agreement.

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Questions related to Facility Based Practices:

If I work in a clinic owned by the hospital, is this considered a facility-based practice?

No. Free standing clinics, centers or other medical practices that are owned or operated by or associated with a hospital or long term care facility that are not physically located within the hospital or long term care facility are not considered facility based practices. Prescriptive authority agreements are required in these settings.

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Is a prescriptive authority agreement required in a hospital or long term care facility-based practice?

Although it is possible to use a prescriptive authority agreement in a hospital or long term care facility based practice, it is not required. You may continue to practice under protocols in these settings. APRNs and PAs must exercise prescriptive authority under one of these delegation mechanisms.

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At how many facilities can one physician delegate prescriptive authority through protocols?

A physician may delegate prescriptive authority via facility based protocol at no more than one licensed hospital or no more than two long term care facilities.

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Who may delegate prescriptive authority in a hospital facility-based practice?

In a hospital facility based practice, the delegating physician may be the medical director, the chief of medical staff, the chair of the credentialing committee, a department chair, or a physician who consents to the request of the medical director or chief of the medical staff to delegate.

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Who may delegate prescriptive authority in a long term care facility based practice?

In a long term care facility based practice, delegation is by the medical director.

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Question related to Nurse Anesthetists:

Is a nurse anesthetist required to have prescriptive authority and register that delegation with the Texas Medical Board?

Section 157.058 of the Texas Occupations Code was not changed by the passage of SB 406.CRNAs are required to have physician delegation to order drugs and devices for the purpose of...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Questions related to Controlled Substances:

Who can prescribe Schedule II drugs under physician delegation?

APRNs or PAs may prescribe schedule II drugs in the following situations:...Toggle Expand/Collapse Text

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Can schedule II authority be delegated in a free standing emergency department that is affiliated with a hospital?

No. A free standing emergency department is not located within the hospital anddoes not qualify as an eligible site for delegation of schedule II authority. The physician may only delegate authority to prescribe controlled substances in schedules III through V in this setting. Authority to prescribe dangerous drugs, nonprescription drugs and devices may be delegated in any setting.

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How often is physician consultation required when prescribing controlled substances?

APRNs and PAs must consult with the delegating physician for refills of a prescription for controlled substances after the initial 90 day supply. Consultation is also required when prescribing controlled substances for children under the age of two years. In both cases, the consultation must be documented in the patient’s medical record.

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Can APRNs and PAs in hospital-based clinics continue to prescribe drugs in schedules III through V?

Yes. Nothing changed for delegation of prescriptive authority for controlled substances in schedules III through V.

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Where and when may a physician assistant (PA) or advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) prescribe a Schedule II Controlled Substance?

Properly authorized APRNs and PAs may issue prescriptions for Schedule II controlled substances to patients who are admitted to a hospital for an intended length of stay of at least 24 hours or receiving services in the hospital’s emergency department, contingent upon the prescription being filled at the hospital’s facility-based pharmacy....Toggle Expand/Collapse Text 

A PA or APRN may also issue such prescriptions as part of the plan of care for the treatment of a person who has executed a written certification of a terminal illness, has elected to receive hospice care, and is receiving hospice treatment from a qualified hospice provider.

Outside of such a hospital facility-based practice or qualified hospice provider setting, a PA or APRN may not issue prescriptions for Schedule II controlled substances.

HOSPITAL, FACILITY-BASED CARE
Section 157.0511(b-1)(1) of the Medical Practice Act relates to prescribing to patients while in a hospital facility-based practice under Section 157.054. This language allows a properly authorized PA or APRN, consistent with policies approved by the hospital's medical staff or a committee of the hospital's medical staff as provided by the hospital bylaws, to issue a Schedule II controlled substance prescription as long as the prescription is filled at the in-hospital pharmacy for a patient who is either admitted to the hospital for an intended length of stay of at least 24 hours or is receiving services in the emergency department of the hospital.

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May a PA or an APRN prescribe Schedule II prescriptions to the patient as part of the hospital’s discharge process?

The law does not allow Schedule II prescriptions to be written by PAs or APRNs with the intent that the prescription be filled outside of the hospital facility-based practice setting. In order for such a prescription to be lawful, it must be filled at the hospital’s facility-based pharmacy. ....Toggle Expand/Collapse Text 

PAs and APRNs who issue Schedule II prescriptions upon discharge must educate patients regarding the requirement to have the prescription filled at the facility-based pharmacy in order to avoid disruption of care. If a Schedule II prescription is to be filled anywhere outside the hospital facility-based setting, the prescription must be completed by a licensed physician.

In accordance with Section 157.054(a-1) of the Medical Practice Act and Board Rule §193.2(6), a hospital facility-based practice setting does not include free standing clinics—including clinics located on hospital grounds, but not physically attached to the hospital’s main structure—community health centers, or other medical practices associated with or owned and operated by the hospital.

HOSPICE CARE
Section 157.0511(b-1)(2) of the Medical Practice Act allows for PAs and APRNs to write Schedule II controlled substance prescriptions as part of the plan of care for the treatment of a person who has executed a written certification of a terminal illness, has elected to receive hospice care, and is receiving hospice treatment from a qualified hospice provider. Under this section, Schedule II prescriptions written by a PA or APRN may not be for any other purpose than hospice care being provided to a patient.


APRN License Numbers

Frequently Asked Questions on new APRN license numbers

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What will my new license number look like?

The new license number is alpha-numeric. It will be AP followed by 6 digits (example: AP999999).

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How can I find out what my APRN license number is?

To find out your license number, click on “Verify license.” In order to be provided your APRN license number, you must look up your license using either your Texas RN license number or your date of birth and last four digits of your social security number.

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Will the Board notify all appropriate parties of my new number, or is that my responsibility?

The Board has notified a large number of key stakeholders regarding the change in procedure, but will not notify each individual stakeholder or distribute a list of numbers detailing what a particular APRN’s new license number is. It is up to the APRN to notify all appropriate parties of his/her new Texas APRN license number.

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Which license number will I need to provide to other parties (e.g. credentialing, 3rd party payers, Texas Medical Board website)?

The Board of Nursing advises you to check with these entities directly. The Board of Nursing notified a large number of key stakeholders regarding this upcoming change to APRN licensure. However, the Board of Nursing cannot speak to the requirements of other jurisdictions or agencies. Click here to see the stakeholder notification letter.

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Can (I, my employer, credentialer, 3rd party payer, etc…) look up my APRN number online by using my Texas RN number?

Yes. Nurse licensure can be verified online 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and can be searched by first and last name, license number, or date of birth and last four digits of social security number. Your APRN license number will be provided through our online verification system if your license is searched using either your Texas RN license number or date of birth and last four digits of your social security number. Your license number will not appear online if your license is searched using only your name.

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Will I get a new number for each APRN title I hold?

No. Only one APRN license number will be issued and each title will be tied to that number.

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Will I receive a new wall certificate?

One APRN wall certificate will be mailed as a courtesy with your next APRN renewal, provided that your license is renewed between April 2014 and April 2016. For those wanting a copy before or after these dates, please visit our website and print the online verification for your records. Remember, you must search by either the license number or Date of Birth and last four digits of social security number to be get the most specific information on licensure.

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When will I receive a new wall certificate?

An APRN wall certificate will be mailed to you the next time you renew your APRN license provided the renewal occurs between April 2014 and April 2016.

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Is this number required to be on a prescription?

The required prescription information does not currently require your RN or APRN number. It requires your Prescriptive Authority Number as well as other information. A list of this information can be found under What Needs to be on a Prescription?

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Do I still have to maintain and renew my RN license?

Yes. You must maintain your RN license in order to have an APRN license.

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If the expiration date on my compact RN license from another state does not coincide with my Texas APRN License #, what will my expiration date be for my Texas APRN license?

The APRN license will still be issued in accordance with the rules and regulations stating that the license expiration date is based on birth month and year (biennium).

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Can I renew my APRN License online?

At this time, only Texas RNs who are also licensed APRNs can renew their APRN license online in conjunction with their RN renewal. Please be aware that certain eligibility issues may prohibit online renewal. A paper renewal application is still required for APRNs using a compact RN license from another state or those wishing to renew their Texas RN only (thereby placing the APRN license on inactive status).

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Why are APRN’s being issued license numbers?

It has been the goal of the Texas Board of Nursing to comply as closely as possible with the Consensus Model for APRN Regulation: Licensure, Accreditation, Certification, and Education. Senate Bill 406, passed during the 83rd Regular Legislative session, has given the Texas Board of Nursing clear authority to issue an APRN license. Like LVNs and RNs, APRNs now have the term “license” used when talking about their authorization to practice in the state of Texas.

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What is the benefit of issuing an APRN License number?

Advanced practice nursing has evolved as a result of the complexity of services provided and the level of knowledge, skills, and competence required by individuals who are authorized to provide such care. The services provided by APRNs exceed the scope of practice of registered nurses. Therefore, the potential for harm to the public is significantly greater for APRNs than for RNs, and a higher level of accountability for the APRN is necessary. Typically, licensure is considered the preferred method of regulation when the regulated activities are complex, requiring specialized knowledge, skills, and decision-making. Licensure in any profession is required when the potential for greater risk of harm to the public exists and the professional must be held to the highest level of accountability. Issuance of a license number provides a better mechanism to track APRNs and will make it easier for employers, credentialing organizations, third party payers and others who need to quickly and easily identify an APRN as a licensed provider.

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Will there be separates fee to renew my APRN License # and my RN #?

The fee structure has not changed. APRNs with a Texas RN license already pay combined fees to renew both the RN and APRN license at the same time.

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Statement: Hydrocodone Containing Products and Tramadol

The Texas Board of Nursing, Texas Medical Board and Texas State Board of Pharmacy advise their respective licensees that the United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) published a final rule reclassifying hydrocodone combination products (HCPs) as Schedule II controlled substances. The reclassification becomes effective on October 6, 2014. HCPs include products such as Lortab®, Vicodin®, and Norco®.

All providers who order, dispense, or prescribe HCPs in the state of Texas must comply with requirements for prescribing Schedule II medications as set forth in state and federal law beginning on October 6, 2014. Advanced practice registered nurses and physician assistants may only prescribe hydrocodone combination products when providing care to hospice patients or practicing in hospital facility based practices as provided for in Chapter 157.0511(b-1) of the Texas Occupations Code and if registered with DEA and DPS to prescribe Schedule II controlled substances.

It is important for all prescribers, pharmacists, and pharmacy staff to be aware that prescriptions written for HCPs on or after October 6, 2014, must be written on a DPS official prescription form and no refills may be authorized. Any prescriptions for HCPs that are dispensed before October 6, 2014, that have additional refills authorized may be dispensed in accordance with state and federal law. The allowance to dispense these refills expires on April 8, 2015.

The Boards of Nursing, Medicine and Pharmacy also remind their respective licensees that the DEA classified tramadol as a Schedule IV controlled substance. This change became effective on August 18, 2014. All prescribers and pharmacy personnel must comply with requirements for ordering, prescribing and handling Schedule IV medications as set forth in state and federal law.

APRNs may find the following resources helpful:

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For more information on these and other topics, use the search field at the top right corner of the page. Should you have further questions or are in need of clarification, please feel free to contact the Board.